What Former Sluts Tell Their Daughters About Sex

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What Former Sluts Tell Their Daughters About Sex

You’re a mom. You’ve had a daughter. You want to tell her the truth about sex. You yourself were "promiscuous" back in the day (or maybe still are, whatever that means). What to do? So inquired a recent online thread that highlights some interesting ideas about how we talk to girls about sexuality, including our own.

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The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging

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aging, elderly hands clasped The hypothesis is so absurd it seems as though it popped right off the pages of a science-fiction novel. Some scientists in Palo Alto are offering a $1 million prize to anyone who can end aging. “Based on the rapid rate of biomedical breakthroughs, we believe the question is not if we can crack the aging code, but when will it happen,” says director of the Palo Alto Longevity… Read More

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In Challenge To Android, Apple Has Banned Apps From Using The iPhone 6’s NFC Payment Chip (AAPL)

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apple iPhone apple pay

One of the most exciting new features of the iPhone 6 is the new "near field communication" (NFC) chip that allows customers to make payments simply by holding their phone near a sensor.

But in an email to Cult of Mac, Apple revealed that the new NFC chip in the iPhone 6 will only be used for one thing: Apple Pay, the company’s new mobile payments feature in iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch.

Instead of opening up the NFC technology to developers, as Samsung does with its range of NFC-enabled smartphones, Apple has closed off its NFC technology and reserved it for the company’s new payment system.

Developers are free to make use of the NFC chips found on hundreds of Android phones, but Apple has taken a drastically different approach to NFC.

It’s likely that Apple may be limiting the use of its new NFC chip as a security measure. During the iPhone 6 presentation, Apple was keen to detail how secure Apple Pay will be, noting that card data is stored on a separate "secure element" on the phone.

Apple seems to be saying its NFC system will be super-secure in large part because it is closed to third party apps and developers. (With the implication, fair or not, that Android’s system is less secure because it’s open.)

apple pay secure element

According to CNET, developers eager to make use of the iPhone 6 may be in luck, just not for some time. Apple confirmed to the site that the NFC chip is limited to Apple Pay only for one year, but they did not indicate whether the company would continue to ban developers from accessing it after that time. 

SEE ALSO: How Secure Is Apple Pay, Really?

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Apple’s One-Click Link to Remove Unwanted U2 from iTunes Marks a Textbook Marketing Fail

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Execution is everything. Musical tastes are personal. And it seems that force-feeding people a new album from U2, unsolicited, doesn’t go over well. Apple giving away U2′s new Songs of Innocence is in itself not a bad thing. But there are two problems. One, the album is poorly reviewed – think Paul McCartney “Wonderful Christmastime” … Continue →

The post Apple’s One-Click Link to Remove Unwanted U2 from iTunes Marks a Textbook Marketing Fail appeared first on Create Digital Music.

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How to set up an Ableton Live project for live performance

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Read more about How to set up an Ableton Live project for live performance at MusicRadar.com


An Ableton Live set offers the electronic performer countless options for creative DJing, spontaneous remixing, live re-editing, processing and hands-on control. Here, we’ll show you how you might go about setting up a Live project to use on stage.

Find out more about performing electronic music live, check out theOctober 2014 edition of Future Music (283).

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Step 1: Here’s a basic layout of six track elements set up in Live’s Session View, divided into horizontal Scenes. Each Scene can be fired by triggering its corresponding Launch button on the Master channel.

Step 2: By triggering individual clips or Scenes with a MIDI controller, we can mix and match clip variations. Global quantisation is set to 1 Bar, meaning each triggered clip will begin playing exactly at the start of the next bar – everything stays perfectly in sync with the host tempo.

Step 3: Only one clip per vertical row can play at once. Empty clip slots feature a Stop button that kills playback of any other clip on that track. By right-clicking an empty clip slot and selecting Remove Stop Button, we can have clips continue to play even when we trigger new Scenes.

Step 4: We’ve set up Audio Effect Racks on various channels, each containing useful performance processing devices such as Auto Filter, Ping-Pong Delay and Beat Repeat. Multiple parameters are assigned to various Macros, and these can be assigned to a MIDI controller’s knobs for on-the-fly effects.

Step 5: Our One Shot channel contains a Drum Rack loaded with a selection of one-shot FX samples. These can be punched in throughout an arrangement via MIDI drum pads or a keyboard for quick transitional effects.

Step 6: There are two Return tracks set up with reverb and delay, so individual channels can be sent to them for interest. This particular project is basic, but it gives you an idea of how a full track can be broken down and remixed on-the-fly.

Read more about How to set up an Ableton Live project for live performance at MusicRadar.com



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How to make a Massive bass sound using wavetable synthesis

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Read more about How to make a Massive bass sound using wavetable synthesis at MusicRadar.com


Native Instruments’ Massive synth has earned itself something of a stigma thanks to its formant-sweeping ‘yoi’ oscillators and general overuse in dubstep. However, its powerful wavetable oscillators can provide nasty, twisted harmonic bass sounds to suit all electronic genres, while its clever ‘performer’ modulation curves enable you to precisely draw in your own modulation shapes, fitting your parameter movements to your track’s tempo.

Here we’re only using Massive’s built-in distortion, EQ and effects to treat our final tone – with just a touch of mid/side filtering from an external plugin to keep the lows and mids centred in the mix. Although this proves how powerful the synth’s output can be in isolation, Massive has been used in countless mainstream tracks, so its raw sound is distinctive and highly recognisable. Experiment with external plugins (distortion, EQ, wideners and modulation effects, for example)to customise the sound further.

For more on synthesising bass sounds in software, check out the October 2014 edition of Future Music (283).

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Step 1: Here’s a bass riff coming from NI Massive’s initial blank preset – a plain and static square/saw tone. Contrasting MIDI note lengths and heavy portamento inside the synth gives interest to the simple pattern. Sidechaining is added using XFer’s LFOTool.

Step 2: Changing the first oscillator to the Kangaroo wavetable gives us a dull but rasping tone. We introduce subtle growling movement over longer notes by using Massive’s Performer LFO to modulate the wavetable position parameter, after designing a custom wave shape for the modulation.

Step 3: For more top-end texture, we turn up the second oscillator and select the Scrapyard wavetable. Again, our custom Performer curve modulates the wavetable position for movement and grit. Even more treble fizz is added by mixing in a touch of white noise from Massive’s Noise oscillator.

Step 4: The Frozen wavetable is now mixed in via the third oscillator, and again, its wavetable position is modulated by our Performer. This thickens the patch but removes some of that original dirtiness – this oscillator can instead be mixed in and out of an arrangement for variation.

Step 5: Our bass lacks aggression, but here’s the magic: Massive’s Parabolic Shaper and Classic Tube effects drive the sound hard, crunching the separate oscillators together and accentuating the wavetables’ modulation for a grittier effect. Built-in EQ adds high-mids and treble for bite.

Step 6: To widen our bass patch, we blend in some of Massive’s Dimension Expander effect. An external EQ plugin in M/S mode high-passes the side signal of the bass at around 500Hz. Our bass’s lows and mids remain solid and mono, but the upper frequencies are widened.

Read more about How to make a Massive bass sound using wavetable synthesis at MusicRadar.com



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Physicists Are Making Solid Light

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Physicists Are Making Solid Light

A team of researchers from Princeton University has started doing some very strange things with light. Instead of letting it zip by at incredibly high speed, they’re stopping it dead: freezing it into crystal.

Crucially, they’re not shining light through crystal; rather, they making light into crystal. It’s a process that involves fixing the particles of light known as photons in a single spot, freezing them permanently in one place. It’s never been done before, and it could help develop new exotic materials with weird and wonderful properties.

So what did they actually do? First, they built a structure made of superconducting materials, which contained 100 billion atoms engineered to act as a kind of artificial atom. Then, they placed the artificial atom close to a superconducting wire containing photons.

The rules of quantum mechanics mean that the photons on the wire then inherited some of the properties of the atom. So, while photons don’t usually interact with each other, in this case they became slightly linked—and began interacting with each other, a bit like particles. Darius Sadri, one of the researchers, explains to Science Blog what that made possible:

"We have used this blending together of the photons and the atom to artificially devise strong interactions among the photons. These interactions then lead to completely new collective behavior for light – akin to the phases of matter, like liquids and crystals, studied in condensed matter physics."

The result: a kind of solid light, where photons are sat frozen in space. The devices—and the crystals—are currently incredibly small right bow. But the hope is that the system will grown, and over time the researchers will be able to make other interesting materials, like superfluids and and insulators, all out of light. Quite what they’ll be used for remains unclear—but it might just be the strangest new material you’ll see. [Physical Review X via Science Blog]

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