World’s First All-Wheel-Drive Fat Bike

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A new kind of fat bike, power is transferred to both the rear and front wheels when you pedal. The result is better traction and mobility on snow and variable terrain.

cristini-awd-5

Built for an expedition to the South Pole, the Cristini AWD fat bike is a veritable Rube Goldberg of drive shafts, universal joints, and shift-on-the-fly clutches. Now, that madness is available to the public.

A marvel of cycling design, this all-wheel-drive bike is available on Cristini’s Kickstarter page. The Philadelphia-based bike builder will sell it until Nov. 19 starting at $5,000.

Bike For Antarctic Expedition

Leeming testing the Cristini AWD 4 prototype

Leeming testing the Cristini AWD 4 prototype

The campaign will raise money for Australian adventurer Kate Leeming’s bicycle expedition across Antarctica via the South Pole.

In 2014, Daniel Burton became the first person to bike to the South Pole, traveling 730 miles.

Leeming’s trip, scheduled for Nov. – Jan. 2017/18, would go coast to coast across the South Pole, approximately 1,150 miles.

Cristini initially built the AWD Fat in 2013 as a prototype. That model was a split-frame design with stays compatible with 4-inch-wide tires.

Testing in Greenland was so successful the Cristini crew decided to shoot for maximum traction. The company made a true fatty capable of 5-inch tubeless Vee Rubber Snowshoe tires.

It went on sale this month. The company touts it as the first production-model all-wheel-drive fat bike.

Two-Wheel-Drive Bicycle

The all-wheel-drive system works through a clutch mechanism that can be disengaged, and it transfers power from the rear hub to the front.

drive-shaft

Rear wheel drive shaft transfers power up through the frame and out to the front hub via a similar shaft

A drive shaft on the non-drive side of the rear hub is turned by the wheel, which is integrated into the frame and spins a universal joint at the top tube.

Power is then carried to the head tube and down through the fork, turning another clutch-engaged drive shaft on the front.

Clear as mud? Watch the video below.


Cristini makes a version with a battery for extra power and also a smaller split-frame model that does not necessitate a u-joint. It accommodates up to 4-inch tires.

Cristini AWD Fat Bike

Cristini first developed all-wheel-drive bicycles in 2001 with AWD mountain bikes.

The company then shifted into the AWD motorcycle market, where it’s been since. Leeming’s request brought the brand back into the cycling world.

The Cristini AWD fat bike is hand built in Philadelphia

The Cristini AWD fat bike is hand-built in Philadelphia

All of Cristini’s bikes are hand-built at its Philadelphia shop.

If you’re tackling your own expedition, or just want to turn heads from everyone stuck in one-wheel drive, check out the brand and its unusual bikes.

”Cristini

  • Price: Starts at $5,000
  • Frame: 6061 T6 aluminum
  • Fork: Carbon
  • Sizes: 16″, 18″, 20″
  • Wheels: Sun Ringle Mulefut 80m Rim – Tubeless setup
  • Drivetrain: SRAM GX Fat Bike 1X11 Kit
  • Weight: 33 lbs

The post World’s First All-Wheel-Drive Fat Bike appeared first on GearJunkie.

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World’s First All-Wheel-Drive Fat Bike

Standard

A new kind of fat bike, power is transferred to both the rear and front wheels when you pedal. The result is better traction and mobility on snow and variable terrain.

cristini-awd-5

Built for an expedition to the South Pole, the Cristini AWD fat bike is a veritable Rube Goldberg of drive shafts, universal joints, and shift-on-the-fly clutches. Now, that madness is available to the public.

A marvel of cycling design, this all-wheel-drive bike is available on Cristini’s Kickstarter page. The Philadelphia-based bike builder will sell it until Nov. 19 starting at $5,000.

Bike For Antarctic Expedition

Leeming testing the Cristini AWD 4 prototype

Leeming testing the Cristini AWD 4 prototype

The campaign will raise money for Australian adventurer Kate Leeming’s bicycle expedition across Antarctica via the South Pole.

In 2014, Daniel Burton became the first person to bike to the South Pole, traveling 730 miles.

Leeming’s trip, scheduled for Nov. – Jan. 2017/18, would go coast to coast across the South Pole, approximately 1,150 miles.

Cristini initially built the AWD Fat in 2013 as a prototype. That model was a split-frame design with stays compatible with 4-inch-wide tires.

Testing in Greenland was so successful the Cristini crew decided to shoot for maximum traction. The company made a true fatty capable of 5-inch tubeless Vee Rubber Snowshoe tires.

It went on sale this month. The company touts it as the first production-model all-wheel-drive fat bike.

Two-Wheel-Drive Bicycle

The all-wheel-drive system works through a clutch mechanism that can be disengaged, and it transfers power from the rear hub to the front.

drive-shaft

Rear wheel drive shaft transfers power up through the frame and out to the front hub via a similar shaft

A drive shaft on the non-drive side of the rear hub is turned by the wheel, which is integrated into the frame and spins a universal joint at the top tube.

Power is then carried to the head tube and down through the fork, turning another clutch-engaged drive shaft on the front.

Clear as mud? Watch the video below.


Cristini makes a version with a battery for extra power and also a smaller split-frame model that does not necessitate a u-joint. It accommodates up to 4-inch tires.

Cristini AWD Fat Bike

Cristini first developed all-wheel-drive bicycles in 2001 with AWD mountain bikes.

The company then shifted into the AWD motorcycle market, where it’s been since. Leeming’s request brought the brand back into the cycling world.

The Cristini AWD fat bike is hand built in Philadelphia

The Cristini AWD fat bike is hand-built in Philadelphia

All of Cristini’s bikes are hand-built at its Philadelphia shop.

If you’re tackling your own expedition, or just want to turn heads from everyone stuck in one-wheel drive, check out the brand and its unusual bikes.

”Cristini

  • Price: Starts at $5,000
  • Frame: 6061 T6 aluminum
  • Fork: Carbon
  • Sizes: 16″, 18″, 20″
  • Wheels: Sun Ringle Mulefut 80m Rim – Tubeless setup
  • Drivetrain: SRAM GX Fat Bike 1X11 Kit
  • Weight: 33 lbs

The post World’s First All-Wheel-Drive Fat Bike appeared first on GearJunkie.

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The 10 Most Valuable Global Brands in 2016

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Apple, Google, and Coca-Cola are the most valuable brands in the world this year, according to recent research from Interbrand.

The annual Interbrand Best Global Brands report was based on an analysis of major brands that derive at least 30% of their revenue from outside their home region. The researchers looked at a number of factors to determine 2016 brand value, including financials, the role of the brand name in purchase decisions, and brand strength. You can see the full methodology here.

Microsoft is the fourth most valuable global brand, the analysis found; Toyota is next, followed by IBM, Samsung, Amazon, Mercedes-Benz, and GE.

Facebook saw the biggest increase (+48%) in brand value in 2016; Amazon was the next fastest growing brand, followed by LEGO, Nissan, Adobe, Starbucks, Zara, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Huawei.



About the research: The report was based on an analysis of major brands that derive at least 30% of their revenue from outside their home region.










Ayaz Nanji is an independent digital strategist and a co-founder of ICW Content, a marketing agency specializing in content creation for brands and businesses. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. He has worked for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji

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AI and Capital Markets Reading the Mind of the Market

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AI Algorithm Economy Blockchain Impact in Capital Markets by Dinis Guarda for tradersdna
AI Algorithm Economy Blockchain Impact in Capital Markets by Dinis Guarda for tradersdna

AI Algorithm Economy Blockchain Impact in Capital Markets by Dinis Guarda for tradersdna

AI and Capital Markets Reading the Mind of the Market

Fintech and special AI, algorithm economy and Blockchain are the drivers capital markets. The bellow guest article defines some of the most defining and challenging area for capital markets AI and how the world economy and trading and investing will cope with the emergence of the AI mind that is managing increasing the world economy.

Reading the mind of the market

This is a guest article by Author: Mark Robertson, a Senior Multi-Asset Portfolio Manager at NN Investment Partners on how NN IP’s multi-asset boutique believes the combination of human judgement, which is still better able to weigh the intricacies of geopolitical events, shifting political alliances, changes in corporate governance and central bank policy; alongside the use of data-derived models, creates a system that is well placed to deal with the complex, ever-changing investment world.

Machine learning, big data and the study of human biases are leading to a deeper understanding of the emotional forces that influence investor behaviour. Combining these elements into the investment process creates a robust framework for guarding against common investor pitfalls.

During a visit to San Francisco I had the opportunity to meet with Dr Richard Peterson, the founder of MarketPsych and one of the leaders in the field of behavioural finance. The use of sentiment analysis was already incorporated in our investment process at that time so this was an opportunity to see how the field of big data and artificial intelligence was progressing. The innovative use of algorithms that can read news articles alongside impressive computing power enables market sentiment to be analysed, and quantified, at a much deeper level than had previously been available. Indices are constructed from thousands of web sources, many within milliseconds of publication, across both professional and social media domains.

The self-learning algorithms developed by Dr Peterson and his team can classify this vast amount of data into sentiment indices such as optimism, fear, joy or conflict. This provides real time insight into the sentiment, both negative and positive, that plays a role in driving markets. The events of Black Thursday in 1929, Black Monday in 1987 and the market crash of 2008 show the dramatic effect these sentiment shifts can have. To sit with Dr Peterson and see how he had taken his brain scanning experiment at Stanford University, and converted that research into a cutting edge news analytics software company, was a revealing insight into how the fusion of humans and data technology was evolving in the world of financial analysis.

The philosophy of the Multi Asset team at NN Investment Partners is a simple one, to combine the best of man and machine. We use robust statistical methods to assess whether the data inputs we are receiving has informational content that can be used in the construction of the toolkit that supports our investment decisions. The structure of this toolkit allows for a great variety of input signals, both fundamentally and behavioural based, and we believe that the behavioural elements can be just as accurately assessed for their predictive value as any other.

This toolkit makes use of digital news and social media feeds, converted into indices via text analytic techniques, to capture real time sentiment within different segments of the asset markets. These behavioural elements sit alongside the team’s fundamental analysis of markets and provide a unique perspective on how “the market” is feeling. The desire to measure the sentiment, or mood, of the market is not new. However, the emergence of social media, self-teaching algorithms and the ability to process large amounts of data, practically in real time, create an entirely new way to achieve this. We leverage on these techniques in our investment process.

The construction of this proprietary toolkit provides a framework for assessing markets, essentially the machine inputs that are then used by our strategists and portfolio managers to meld, with their own research and insights, into a coherent view on financial markets. One of the benefits of using a toolkit in this way is that it helps to protect against the known behavioural pitfalls of investors, not only irrational exuberance and over-confidence, but also fear and loss aversion.

The other aspect of the decision making process where we can benefit from machine discipline is to improve the ability of strategists and portfolio managers as forecasters. Nobel prize-winner Daniel Kahneman, in his 2011 book Thinking Fast and Slow, makes the point that “Whether professionals have a chance to develop intuitive expertise depends essentially on the quality and speed of feedback, as well as on sufficient opportunity to practice”.

What this means is that we can build a framework whereby the use of big data and self-learning algorithms can be used to build predictive models that evolve with the changing social and financial landscape. These inputs can then be utilized in the forecasting process, as feedback to the users where there predictions differ against those generated by the models, to augment the ability of Strategists and Portfolio Managers to make judgements in the highly uncertain world in which they operate.

The use of human judgement, which is still better able to weigh the intricacies of geopolitical events, shifting political alliances, changes in corporate governance and central bank policy, alongside the use of data-derived models that protect against known human biases, creates a system that is well placed to deal with the complex, ever-changing world in which we invest.

This is not the end of the story of course, big data and narrow artificial intelligence is currently the topic du jour however it is quite possible that our next round of innovation will be driven by something completely different. Learning, improving and adapting, in a never ending cycle of technology and innovation, will continue to drive our investment process forward

 

 

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Money Can Buy Happiness, But Only If You Know What Makes You Happy

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The old adage “Money can’t buy happiness” is pithy, but it’s not exactly true. Money can buy lots of things that make you happy. It can also reduce a lot of your stress. However, you still need to know and pursue what will make you happy.

As personal finance site Yes and Yes explains, the adage is meant to convey a more complex, but difficult truth: if everything in your life sucks, money alone won’t magically make everything better. If you know what will make you happy, then money can probably help you get there. Maybe for you happiness is traveling, or exploring your city, or just spending time doing things with the people you love. In all those cases, money can help you, as long as you know what to do with it:

Money can pay for the therapist but it can’t make you change your behavior.

Money can buy you a Match.com membership, but it can’t make your dates any kinder, smarter, or more likely to laugh at that story about your dog.

Money can pay for the home delivery of a lightly dressed green salad, but it can’t prevent you from eating an entire bag of pizza rolls at 11 pm on a Wednesday night.

If you like to travel, money can buy you a plane ticket. If you like to explore your city, money can buy you a ticket to that play downtown. And if you’re happy just spending time with your loved ones, enough money can buy you more time with them and less time working. It’s all in how you use it. You just have to know what you want, first.

Money Doesn’t Matter If Everything Else Sucks | Yes and Yes via Rockstar Finance

Photo by Daniel Novta.

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Why men and women can’t agree on the perfect temperature

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Why men and women can’t agree on the perfect temperature

A thermostat from 'Nest' at CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 08 January 2015. The trade show takes place from 06 to 09 January 2015. Photo by: Britta Pedersen/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

A thermostat from ‘Nest’ at CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 08 January 2015. The trade show takes place from 06 to 09 January 2015. Photo by: Britta Pedersen/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Image: Britta Pedersen/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

As summer becomes a distant memory, evenings sitting in the garden are replaced with curling up in front of the TV with the heating on … or off. Personal preference varies and but there is often said to be a big gender divide when it comes to feeling the cold. But why would men and women have such different temperature comfort ranges?

The biggest factor in all of this is the skin. The skin is the largest organ in the body and performs many functions. It is a protective barrier against pathogens and ultraviolet radiation from the sun, a restrictive barrier to retain water, it helps synthesize vitamin D from sunlight to strengthen our bones, and it regulates internal body temperature. It is also the primary detector of external temperature.

The skin is made up of three distinct layers: the outermost epidermis, the dermis in the middle and the hypodermis. The hypodermis is the deepest layer (think hypodermic needle for injections) and is also known as the subcutaneous fat layer. It’s insulating and designed to keep us warm. If you go through all these layers you usually reach muscle.

Anatomy of the human skin.

Anatomy of the human skin.

Image: AP Photo/Stocktrek Images

While skin cells are important there are also free nerve endings that detect temperatures and relay this information to the brain. These cells sit right next to where the outermost layer of the skin meets the next layer.

Is all skin the same?

There are many differences in skin – colour is perhaps being the most visible. Less visible is skin thickness. The dermis and epidermis is thickest on the buttocks and thinnest on places such as the thighs and middle of the back. However, the thickness of the deepest subcutaneous fat layer also differs. It is thickest on the buttocks, and thinnest on the arms and thighs. Skin thickness also varies with gender. Women’s subcutaneous fat layer is almost twice as thick as that in men; men carry most of their fat in their abdomen around their organs, women subcutaneously beneath their skin.

But fat is said to be an insulator, so why is there such difference in comfortable temperature? Well the body’s natural reaction to cold temperatures is to shiver —this is where your muscles contract involuntarily or shake to generate heat, and it’s controlled by nerves. It is well documented that men have a higher amount of muscle with which to generate heat in cold temperatures, but also ability to generate heat while resting. Men also have a higher basal metabolic rate – energy expended at rest. These two factors give them a higher resting temperature.

If you consider the basic distribution of subcutaneous fat, the female body should maintain warmth better than the male, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. When you take into consideration skin thickness, subcutaneous fat thickness and muscle mass, it becomes clear that although female muscles shiver the same as those in the male, their thicker insulating layer potentially means that the heat they generated takes longer to get through to the outer layers of the skin where the temperature-sensing free nerve endings are located.

Hormones also play a large part in determining comfortable temperature and they cause a more dynamic change in thermoregulation in females than males due to the menstrual cycle. There are also clear differences between amounts of body fat in females depending on ethnic origin. Geographical location can have a huge impact on the need for thick layers of subcutaneous fat to maintain temperature. Some individuals of the Inuit population in Greenland, for example, have 34 percent body fat to maintain temperature in temperatures that range from -8 to 7°C during the year.

So all of these factors may account for why some women and men say they feel the cold differently. Of course many of these differences can also differ between individuals.

Still cold?

Spare a thought for newborns who cannot shiver to keep warm. Their nervous system isn’t developed enough at birth to regulate temperature. However, to compensate for this, they have an abundance of a different type of fat. This brown fat is located around key organs such as the heart and kidneys as well as along the spine to ensure the core remains warm. This fat is thermogenic and creates heat, but, as we age, we lose this fat and it is replaced by white fat (actually yellow in colour) which insulates and acts as an energy store.

So as the nights draw in and the temperature drops, remember there are specific differences in the way our bodies are constructed that mean we feel and respond to changing temperatures differently.

Adam Taylor is the director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre and a senior lecturer at Lancaster University.

This article originally published at The Conversation
here

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This popular ‘Westworld’ fan theory tries to explain the true identity of Bernard

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Ever since HBO’s “Westworld” premiered, fans have had their suspicions about one character in particular (besides the Man in Black). Bernard Lowe is Ford’s right hand man — he’s in charge of behavior and programming. And if you’ve been paying close attention to his scenes, you might have noticed that there are a lot of clues hinting that he may not be exactly who he seems. WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD

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Humanity’s corner of the Milky Way may be larger than expected

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If you accept conventional views of the Milky Way, humans live in a sort of cosmic cul-de-sac: our star is in the Orion Arm (aka Local Arm), a small spur sitting in between the much larger Sagittarius and Perseus arms. A team of international researchers might just shake up that sense of place, however. They’ve published a study indicating that our arm is much, much larger than once thought. Instead, it incorporates a large arm that extends almost all the way to the Perseus Arm, and another long spur that branches between the Orion and Sagittarius arms. It’s now believed to be about 25,000 light years long, or several times longer than expected.

The findings come after discovering several Orion Arm masers, or bright spots of radio emissions frequently caused by gas. Compare them to a readily available source of light on Earth (here, the light from a handheld red laser) and you can gauge their relative distance and speed.

It won’t surprise you to hear that verifying this data could be difficult. The study relied on the northern hemisphere’s Very Long Baseline Array of telescopes, and you’d need info from the southern hemisphere to form a more complete view. It’s not as if you can fly above the galaxy to get a better look, either. Even so, what’s here is enough to suggest that our segment of the Milky Way isn’t just a tiny offshoot, and that we don’t know as much about our galactic home as we think we do.

Via: Space.com

Source: Science Advances

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20-year-old drone photographer turns coastline into stunning art

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Throw away your holiday snaps and deactivate your aspirational Pinterest boards, because Australian man Gabriel Scanu has shut down the photography game.

The 20-year old uses drones to capture some of the most aerial photographs your eyes have ever clapped upon. 

Showcasing the beauty of Australia’s coastline and now travelling regularly, Scanu’s photographs depict the gorgeous contrasts where land meets the ocean.

“The thing I love most about drone photography is the fact that you can capture scenes from a perspective that they are never usually viewed from,” Scanu told Wired.

Scenic composition is in the photographer’s DNA, with Scanu telling From Where I Drone that his father Viv, a cinematographer, introduced him to the art capturing real life on film, all at the tender age of 12.

The photographer recently returned from a trip to the United States where he captured some instantly recognisable landmarks from almost abstracted vantage points.

It’s all a bit jaw-dropping, a little vertigo-inducing and entirely beautiful.

With the Australian summer fast approaching, keep your eyes glues to Scanu’s Instagram and YouTube any time you need a quick burst of awe. 

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