Dubai is getting these stunning $23 million floating villas that can withstand sea level rise

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Private islands 3 1

Like a number of coastal areas around the world, the United Arab Emirates is becoming increasingly vulnerable to sea level rise.

According to a 2017 study from the Emirates Wildlife Society and World Wildlife Fund, researchers expect ocean levels to rise around three feet by 2100. If that happens, water would inundate about 8.1% of the Emirate of Ajman, 1.2% of the Emirate of Sharjah, and 5.9% of the Emirate of Umm Al-Quwain. Many UAE residents live in these coastal areas.

A new type of floating home could withstand future rising sea levels. Waterstudio, a Dutch architecture firm that exclusively designs floating structures, is creating 33 private villas on artificial islands off the coast of Dubai. Developer Dutch Docklands will build the first one this month.

The buoyed islands will bob up and down with water levels so they won’t flood, Waterstudio founder Koen Olthuis told Business Insider.

Take a look at the project below.

SEE ALSO: These $2 million floating homes are designed to withstand Category 4 hurricanes

This year, Dubai is getting its first of 33 floating villas by Waterstudio, which collaborated with French oceanographer Jean-Michel Cousteau.

There’s no set timeline on when the entire neighborhood, dubbed Amillarah, will be complete.

The islands will also include outdoor patios with trees and a pool.

The homes will not exactly be affordable. Each island will cost between $23 million and $27.5 million.

They went on sale in 2015.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Ingestible gut sensors reveal potential new immune system

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Ingestible technology — the stalwart theme of medical sci-fi — has been in the works for decades, but now researchers are closer than ever before to taking it mainstream thanks to successful trials of gas-sensing capsules. The swallowable sensors, designed by RMIT University in Australia, could revolutionize the way gut disorders and diseases are diagnosed and treated, offering a potential game-changer for the one-in-five people worldwide who will suffer from gastrointestinal problems in their lifetimes.

The capsule is the size of a vitamin pill and works by detecting and measuring gut gas in real time, then sending data to a mobile phone. Trials have uncovered bodily mechanisms never seen before, including what could be an entirely new immune system. "We found that the stomach releases oxidising chemicals to break down and beat foreign compounds that are staying in the stomach for longer than usual," said study lead and capsule co-inventor Professor Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh. "This could represent a gastric protection system against foreign bodies. Such an immune mechanism has never been reported before." The researchers also found evidence that the colon contains oxygen, contradicting previously-held beliefs that it’s an oxygen-free area of the body.

The technology also provides a more effective way of measuring and analyzing activities in the gut. Scientists would previously have to rely on faecal samples or invasive surgery, which Kalantar-zadeh noted is "not a true reflection of the gut microbiota at that time". The capsule has now passed human trials, and the team is exploring ways of commercialising the technology, partnering with development company Planet Innovation to bring the product to market.

Via: Science Daily

Source: Nature.com

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A study of 50,000 people is the best evidence yet that personality changes throughout your life

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youth old woman past and future young and old

  • A new analysis of 14 studies comprising 50,000 people may provide the best evidence yet that personality is not fixed through life.
  • Subjects in the US and throughout Europe showed considerable changes in their personalities as they aged.
  • Many of the changes were broadly consistent, although some people did change in unique ways.

You might be fundamentally you for your entire life, but don’t expect your personality to stay the same.

That’s according to a major study of 50,000 people over the course of several decades, which found the traditional notion of personality — as fixed and unchanged after adolescence — is mostly untrue.

People included in the sample showed a common trend as they got older, declining in all five major personality metrics that psychologists have come to trust as the gold-standard.

Psychologists have been writing about personality for the better part of three centuries, beginning most famously with William James’ 1890 text "The Principles of Psychology." Relying on personal observation, James wrote that personality is "set like plaster" after age 30.

In the century or so since "The Principles of Psychology" was published, psychologists have come to rethink personality in bits and pieces. In 2003, the American Psychological Association observed the changing consensus among members of the field: Personality was beginning to look more like it was ever-evolving, even through old age.

The latest study combined 14 longitudinal studies that gathered information about people’s personalities, including data from the United States, Europe, and Scandinavia. Many of the subjects had already reached adulthood, which gave the researchers unique perspective on personality changes. Typically, studies skew toward young people.

Of the Big Five personality traits — neuroticism, conscientiousness, openness, extroversion, and agreeableness — all five showed major fluctuations across individual participants’ lives. And all traits, except for agreeableness, showed downward trends of about 1-2% per decade across the overall studies.

In part, this suggested to researchers that the so-called "Dolce Vita" effect was real — that when people age, they enjoy fewer social responsibilities and can do more of what they want.

People can be less neurotic about conforming to the group, less open to trying new things in order to savor the classics, less conscientious as they become more selfish, and less extroverted as they keep more to themselves.

These trends appeared at nearly every stage of the 14 studies and held mostly steady across different geographical regions. Some regions deviated from the norm, however. People from the US showed considerably larger declines in extroversion as they aged, which signaled to the investigators that they were especially done with with seeming social.

People aren’t set in plaster, as William James asserted 128 years ago. They’re more like clay, constantly getting molded by their changing circumstances.

SEE ALSO: A Stanford study of 45 million students found something startling about which kids succeed

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: I tried the 7-minute workout for a month — here’s what happened

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This $33,500 home can resist earthquakes and pop up in under 7 hours

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MADI

  • Designed by Italian architect Renato Vidal, the MADI home can be built in six to seven hours with the help of a crane and a three-person construction crew.
  • The pre-fabricated, earthquake-resistant home could come in handy for disaster situations.
  • Prices range from $33,560 to $74,300.

 

Building a traditional home can take anywhere from a few weeks to months, depending on the model and specifications. But in recent years, a growing number of architects have turned to pre-fabricated construction — where parts are built off-site and assembled on-site) — making the process a lot quicker and oftentimes cheaper.

Italian architect Renato Vidal’s MADI home is an A-frame house that can go up in under seven hours with the help of a crane and a three-person construction crew.

As Curbed notes, the homes could act as temporary housing for victims of disaster, since it can be built so quickly and doesn’t require foundational soil. It can also be used for residential or hospitality purposes. The home’s galvanized steel frame helps it resist earthquakes.

Vidal offers MADIs in three sizes: 290 square feet, 603 square feet, and 904 square feet. Depending on the model — some of which include staircases — prices range from $33,560 to $74,300. Each home features two floors of living space, a kitchen, and a bathroom.

MADI

In a factory in Apulia, Italy, wood specialist Area Legno manufactures the timber home’s parts, which arrive flatpacked (similar to Ikea furniture). A third-party construction crew then assembles the foundation, and pulls up the frame using a crane. Lastly, interior walls, windows, and flooring are added, and the electrical system, plumbing, and HVAC system are installed. From start to finish, the process takes six to seven hours. MADIs can be disassembled just as quickly.

This month, the team started selling the home outside Italy. It’s now available in North Europe, the United States, and Australia as well.

Watch it unfold below:

MADI

SEE ALSO: A public square is being handed over to Apple for its newest flagship store — and some locals are furious

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 7 science-backed ways for a happier and healthier 2018 — this is what you do the very first week

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The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

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There’s an idea that has been perpetuated, however unintentionally, that photographers do one thing and one thing only. The illusion is that someone who carries the title of “professional photographer” must simply make photographs, sell them, and that is the sole source of their income.

It’s true that there are some of us who do in fact make our way exclusively through our photography as an end in itself. I feel that most if not all of us camera jockeys (especially the landscape and nature types) hold as an ultimate goal the notion that one day we can reach a point in our careers when our photographs alone can carry us through life.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

A few years back I was happy to learn and am equally glad to tell you now, that most if not all photographers are extremely diversified in the way they make a living from photography. Even most of the greats…from Ansel Adams to Cartier-Bresson, did other forms of photo-related work until they become famous enough to concentrate on their photography as a full-time job.

Almost every photographer diversifies to some extent. In this article, we’re going to talk about why it’s so important to branch out into other areas of photography beyond just making photos.

The Art of Diversification

It’s not generally disclosed to us when we first start out in photography that the majority of professional shooters don’t simply make their living from selling prints. This is especially true during these enormously competitive days when everyone with a cell phone is a “professional” photographer.

The truth is, it’s just plain difficult to make money from the sale of prints alone. You have to diversify in order to survive. The great thing is, if you’re truly in love with photography, everything that you do that centers around your beloved medium doesn’t seem like work. And it’s that word, “work”, that makes the world go round.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

Diversifying yourself means that you will likely need to take a tiny step just outside the perimeter of your comfort zone. You must actively be on the watch for new opportunities to either market yourself through new outlets and to investigate what possibilities might be available to you. The key is to not limit yourself just because a certain opportunity is new to you or because it may not involve actual camera work.

Ways to Diversify Yourself

You may be thinking, “Alright, I need to diversify…but how and with what?” This goes back to what we spoke about a little earlier about how today’s world of digital photography has become more far-reaching than ever before. There is an incredible number of new ways for you to branch out into other areas of photography. Really, you are only limited by your ambition and your willingness to seek out brand new streams of creativity and dare I say, fresh revenue.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

The most rewarding method to diversify yourself and your horizons, is by helping your fellow photographers through artistic and technical education.

I got my own start in the photographic educational world right here at Digital Photography School. That opened up amazing new opportunities for me to not only expand myself as a photographer but also to help others who are just beginning their own journeys. Look for ways to give back to your peers and teach what you know. This could be through writing, giving photography workshops, educational videos, and even gear reviews.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

By no means are these the only ways to branch out and diversify yourself. The key is to start looking for the outlets to begin with. Once you do, you might be shocked to learn about all the ways photography impacts people’s lives beyond the obvious.

If you’re not keen on the educational route (you should really try it) then keep searching and be open to other areas of enrichment. Start a newsletter showcasing your work and link to gear you use (there are some great affiliate programs out there to help you make an income that way). Try blogging about your photo outings. Building a simple blog space is easier than ever these days. Most importantly, don’t allow yourself to grow stagnant and stop looking for ways to grow.

Some Final Thoughts….

Is it possible to make a living from only selling prints or through only making photographs? Absolutely. Depending on your own genre of photography it could be more or less difficult. Generally, the majority of photographers whose main income does, in fact, come from print sales find themselves looking for other ways to incorporate photography as a part of a larger professional whole.

I found that I loved teaching others about photography and writing about all the aspects of making photographs. This led me to produce my own Lightroom presets and a whole host of other unlikely photography related jobs that I could never have imagined were possible only four or five years ago.

The most important thing to remember is that diversifying yourself and your talents can do nothing but good and help you to grow as a photographer. Never stop looking for ways to advance yourself not only monetarily but also creatively in your work. Branch out. Reach out. Carpe consequat…seize the photography.

The post The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer by Adam Welch appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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Life Hack: Just Buy All Of The Porsche 964s At Once

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All photos via RM Sotheby’s

If you spend all of your days agonizing over which 964-generation Porsche 911 to buy, RM Sotheby’s “Exclusively Porsche” collection heading to Amelia Island just gave you an easy answer. The 964 is good in all its forms, so you should buy all of them.

Twelve 964s are up for sale in the collection—individually, but don’t let that stop you from buying them all. That’s what we’d recommend, anyway. Who needs silly things like life savings or a house when our meaningless lives will probably end in a horrifying nuclear apocalypse anyway? Buying all the 911s is simply the most prudent use of your cash.

1993 Carrera RSR 3.8
1993 Carrera RS 3.8

The 964 is the generation that immediately preceded the 993, spanning from 1989 to 1994. While even a base example of a 964 would be nice, the collection Sotheby’s has for sale includes a few doozies: a 1993 Carrera RS 3.8 valued between $1.25-1.5 million, a 1993 Turbo S “Leichtbau” that should fetch between $1-1.2 million and a 1993 RSR 3.8 worth around $1.2-1.4 million.

1989 Flatnose
1991 Turbo 3.3

Most of the other cars should fetch between $200,000 and $250,000, but there’s still some impressive metal in that list, including a 1994 Speedster, a flatnose 1989 Turbo (which is technically a 930 instead of a 964, but fit with the collector’s aesthetic), a 1992 Carrera RS, a 1991 Turbo 3.3, a 1994 Turbo 3.6, and a 1993 RS America.

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Winning Radwood with an obscenely rare flatnose might cost just a little more, with the utterly coketacular 1994 Turbo S X83 “Flachbau” expected to fetch between $500,000-$650,000. The more smoothed-out 1994 Turbo S X85 “Flachbau” up for sale keeps the 911's more traditional round lights, but it will also grab between $600,000-$800,000.

1994 Turbo S X83 Flachbau
1994 Turbo S X85 Flachbau

If you’re more of a track rat, a 1991 Carrera Cup is in the mix, expected to sell for between $250,000-$325,ooo. I’ve long answered the question of “which Porsche is best Porsche?” with “race car,” anyway. That would be my sub-million-dollar pick if I only got to pick one, but it just seems easier to decide which is the best later.

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Well, that is, if you can decide. Yikes, that sounds like an actual commitment. Again, it’s best just to buy all the 964s and call it good.

Bonus: if for some reason humanity survives longer than expected, congratulations! Aircooled 911s just keep shooting up in value and you’ll have several excellent examples, you fancy-person, you. Go drive the snot out of them, regardless.

1993 Carrera RS America
1993 Leichtbau
1991 911 Carrera Cup
1994 Turbo 3.6
1992 Carrera RS
1994 Speedster

[via Carscoops]

Correction [2:47 p.m.]: We originally didn’t note the lone 930, but reached out to RM Sotheby’s for clarification. Your eyes did not deceive you—that chunky-bumpered flatnose is an early-1989 930! These cars all come from one man’s personal collection of cool, rare Porsche 911s, and the 930 was in there.

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The Best and Worst Workouts to Do As a Couple

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Try this at your own risk. Photo by Duncan Rawlinson.

When I took a dance class with my husband years ago, the instructor told us that any couples in the class should split up and dance with others. “We have a tendency to say things to our partner that we wouldn’t to other people,” I remember her saying. “Like, ‘Honey, you’re doing it wrong.’”

It was true—we switched partners every few minutes, and whenever my husband came up in the rotation we would end up bickering about who was dancing wrong. (Honestly, we were new to this. It was both of us.)

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There are some things you and your partner can do together to get some exercise, but you’ve got to be careful about choosing the right kind of workout. Big no-no’s:

  • Anything competitive (even a little bit)
  • Anything you’re both trying to learn (Honey, you’re doing it wrong)
  • Anything where you cover distance, like running or cycling

There’s a further pitfall, which can happen with any workout buddy you know well: instead of motivating each other to go to the gym, you can end up talking each other into staying home. (If it’s been a long day, you’re both tired.) If you’re convinced this could never happen to you, here are some ways to try working out with your sweetie.

How to Work Out Together

Don’t do the same thing. That’s the golden rule. If you try to just “go for a run together” and your partner is faster than you, they will resent having to slow down and you’ll tire yourself out trying to speed up. Even if you are exactly the same pace, this is still a no. After a while, one of you will get faster, and then you have the above problems plus an added question of why are they getting faster and I’m not? (Maybe they have more time to run, maybe they’re biologically gifted, doesn’t matter. You’ll still be pissed off about it.)

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Instead, go to the track together, and each run your own workout. You’re still in the same place, so you can meet up at water breaks and you can still go for beer or ice cream together afterwards. Make it a date, not a race.

Try this with any activity you can do in the same place, but not side-by-side. You can go to the pool and swim laps together—ideally in separate lanes. I can successfully go to the gym with my husband, and he’ll do his workout while I do mine. We coordinate a brief stretch of time where we spot each other on the bench press, trying very hard to keep our mouths shut, and then we go our separate ways again.

Couples can also survive a class together if you’re in a situation where you only pay attention to the instructor and never to each other. For example, a group cycling class, with loud music, in the dark. Do not sit on adjacent bikes.

I hear that it’s possible to coexist while doing partnered bodyweight moves or stretches, but I’m skeptical.

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There is one exception to the rule about doing things together. You can go ahead if it’s an activity you’re both good at, and that is well under your capability. A leisurely stroll, for example. You’re not going to correct how your partner walks (I hope). Or a scenic bike ride that is not at all a race, not even when you get to a hill. (Perhaps it’s best to avoid hills.)

Oh, and if you’d like to take advantage of the phenomenon where we work a little harder in a group or with a stronger workout buddy, do yourself a favor: go find a friendly coaching group, or turn an aquaintance into a workout buddy. Leave your partner out of this.

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Snow falls on the usually quite hot Sahara Desert

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Snow falls on the usually quite hot Sahara Desert

Snow on the Sahara.
Snow on the Sahara.

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Africa’s Sahara Desert isn’t the place you’d expect to see snow.

Yet a rare winter storm powdered the arid sand dunes of northwestern Algeria with white snow on Sunday, the third time an event like this has happened in 40 years.

What’s even odder is snow also fell on the Sahara last year. Before that, the town of Ain Sefra saw snow all the way back in 1979, albeit for only half an hour.

The region typically experiences blisteringly hot weather in summer, exceeding temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius). However, it cools right down in winter, hitting an average low of 31.5 degrees Fahrenheit (-0.5 degrees Celsius).

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883a) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

While the Sahara is a long way away from the freezing temperatures the eastern U.S. is experiencing right now, the desert is receiving the same cold air. 

That cold air crossed the Atlantic, creating heavy snowfall in Morocco, then on sprinkled a little on the Sahara.

“We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5 p.m.,” photographer Karim Bouchetata said. 

Of course, the photos are really something else.

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883ab) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883ad) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883af) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883c) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883i) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock (9309883k) Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria Snow in the Sahara Desert - 07 Jan 2018 *Full story: http://bit.ly/2Et2Lm8 As much of the northern hemisphere sees record cold temperatures, the SAHARA Desert has been hit by SNOW for the second time in four decades. Photographers have taken incredible pictures of 40cm deep snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra after a freak winter storm yesterday (Sun). The town in the world's HOTTEST desert had not seen snow for 37 years when it arrived this time last year and locals were stunned when it began falling on the red sand dunes yesterday morning. Snow started falling in the early hours of Sunday morning and it quickly began settling on the sand. Photographer Karim Bouchetata said: "We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again. It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5pm."

Image: Geoff Robinson Photography/REX/Shutterstock

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