Yep, you can go virtuoso with ROLI – DiViNCi, Alluxe show you how

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You may have met ROLI’s Seaboard and Lightpad Blocks – the squishy performance controllers for computers and mobile. But all these promises about futuristic instruments aside, can you really wail on them? Computer says yes.

Finger drummer virtuoso DiViNCi is an absolute monster on these things. It reminds me of a couple of hyperactive drummer friends I grew up with, rapping on tables, only this actually works as a live performance. And whatever genre you’re into, this proves that if your ideas happen to be, you know – fast ideas – you can make them happen. Watch:

There’s actually a lot going on there, so even more useful than drooling over this performance demo is watching step-by-step as he pulls apart his live setup. He came to the jam without a plan, but … then that means some planning in setup, to make this function well as an all-in-one, one-man-band rig. This involves setting up some keys in advance, and configuring sounds, so that the setup is out of the way and he can lose himself and jam – even literally with his eyes closed.

ROLI’s hardware – for the moment, at least – doesn’t make any sound on its own, so it’s necessary to dig into the ROLI Dashboard to connect the hardware with software. That software in turn got some updates, recently, if you haven’t checked in on it lately.

It’s important to DiViNCi’s set that he combines the talkbox and the Blocks-controlled software instrument. Let’s check in, too, with Laura Escude aka Alluxe, and her “future classical” setup. Laura is someone special, in that she’s not only built a career as a solo musician and electronic instrumentalist, but also as a high-powered teacher and consultant, setting up live shows on the biggest imaginable scale for the likes of Kanye West and others. (She was also just added to the lineup at the next Ableton Loop in her home city LA in the fall, so see you all in California, hopefully!)

That said, it’s really Laura’s own performances that are the most personal. Instead of the ultra-compact Blocks, here she uses the Seaboard RISE keyboard controller – still my personal favorite. (Just squishy enough, more room to play on, but not so big that you can’t tote it around… and unlike the very first Seaboard, not too squishy. Squishy – technical term, hope you’re keeping up.)

She works with Ableton Live to set up sounds so the instrument can work through her setlist and stay expressive as she focuses on other stuff – like singing, for example.

That’s an interesting way of doing it, by the way – so it’s program changes in Live, triggered inside clips, triggered by follow actions. (I’ve been procrastinating doing a story just on how to manage different sounds in Live sets … it’s time.)

Some more resources:

Use Seaboard RISE with Kontakt

Use RISE with Apple Logic Pro and Equator

My Seaboard artist stories

The post Yep, you can go virtuoso with ROLI – DiViNCi, Alluxe show you how appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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Immerse yourself in Rotterdam’s sonic voltages, in the WORM laboratory

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It’s dubbed a “Waveform Research Centre” – and Rotterdam’s gear-stuffed WORM laboratory is a science fiction playground for voltages, making music and visuals alike. Let’s go inside.

Dennis Verschoor is a mainstay of the Rotterdam experimental electronic scene, with some decades of artist experience to his name and the legendary Noodlebar performance series. Filmmaker Steve Guy Hellier joins Thonk’s Steve Grimley-Taylor to produce a short film about him and this amazing space: (thanks, Sonic State, hat tip)

From the description:

I first met Dennis whilst I was in the WORM studio on an artist residency in 2017. The WORM studio is like a geological trip through electronic music’s history but I was about to travel even further back. Strange ghostly tones emanated from the old vocal booth next door, it was this space that Dennis had filled with mid 20th century audio test equipment, going back to the roots of audio electronic experiments before commercially available instruments from Moog or Roland, before keyboards, back to Stockhausen, Else Marie Pade, Daphne Oram, Raymond Scott and the like. Why now? is this the logical conclusion of Mark Fisher’s cultural hauntology? do we end up back at the source? the sound of past futures? For Dennis it seemed more a way to dodge the hipsters, and invite collaboration.

Dennis and I had a friend in common Steve Grimley-Taylor, a lover of all things electronic and sound related (founder of Thonk.co.uk). When I expressed the idea of making a film about Dennis, Richard Foster from WORM kindly agreed to let us. This is a short film about Dennis, his journey and his room.

Steve Guy Hellier 2018

You know what time it is, kids? It’s gear pr0n, time. Some waveform pics to get your Friday night started right.

WORM Rotterdam is also a great all-encompassing event venue.

The WRC has its own Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Waveform-Research-Centre-1157781711025359/

Information on the Sound Studio:

https://worm.org/spaces/sound-studio/

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Ugh, of course ‘Snapchat dysmorphia’ is a thing in plastic surgery now

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Social media filters gave teenagers versions of themselves with flawless skin and big baby blues. What did we expect to happen?!

Doctors have been worrying about the impact that social media has on self-image for a while. But now the term “snapchat dysmorphia” has now made it into the pages of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

In a co-authored opinion piece (spotted by Inverse) titled “Selfies — Living in the era of filtered photographs,” three plastic surgeons sound the alarm about how selfie filters are impacting people seeking plastic surgery, especially those suffering from the medical disorder body dysmorphia. 

The way people look in filtered selfies — with smooth skin, symmetrical features, full lips, and big, sparkly eyes — has become a new basis for obsession in people with body dysmorphic disorder, or, “an excessive preoccupation with a perceived flaw in appearance” that can cause them to seek frequent plastic surgery.

In the past, the doctors write, people would bring in photoshopped images of celebrities to plastic surgery consultations (which is totally cool and not worrisome at all!). But now, prospective patients — including teens — are using filtered images of their faces from apps like Snapchat to inform what they want their faces to look like after going under the knife. 

“‘Snapchat dysmorphia’ has patients seeking out cosmetic surgery to look like filtered versions of themselves instead, with fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a thinner nose,” the authors write. “This is an alarming trend because those filtered selfies often present an unattainable look and are blurring the line of reality and fantasy for these patients.”

Snapchat dysmorphia isn’t exactly new. Earlier this year, a plastic surgeon known as Dr. Esho coined the phrase, and it was popularized in several articles in February 2018. A January 2018 study found that a desire to look better in selfies was a prevalent reason people were seeking plastic surgery. And a 2015 study found that “self photo editing and photo investment are associated with body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls.” 

But, come on, what were we expecting? People with extra cash have long sought out ways to artificially perfect their appearances with surgery. Now, instead of just staring into the mirror or pages of magazines in wistful dissatisfaction, everyone has a pocket-sized Magic Mirror, showing them how they could be the most beautiful of them all — if only they could look like Flower Crown girl filter, IRL. 

The most concerning thing here is that perhaps people wouldn’t have otherwise found flaws in a few pimples or perfectly normal-sized eyes if face-tuning hadn’t existed. Perhaps body dysmorphia is increasing thanks to Snapchat. However, at this point, anecdotal evidence from plastic surgeons, and opinion pieces like Thursday’s articles, is insufficient to draw that causal connection. 

But let’s just say we wouldn’t be surprised if a study is soon able to connect the adorably sprinkled fake freckles.

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James Bond’s Tactics for Figuring Out If Someone’s Been Snooping in Your Room

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“Doing all this, inspecting these minute burglar-alarms, did not make him feel foolish or self-conscious. He was a secret agent, and still alive thanks to his exact attention to the detail of his profession. Routine precautions were to him no more unreasonable than they would be to a deep-sea diver or a test pilot, or to any man earning danger-money. Satisfied that his room had not been searched while he was at the casino, Bond undressed and took a cold shower.” —Casino Royale, by Ian Fleming

When James Bond was out on assignment around the world, he sometimes stayed in nice, swanky hotels. Yet while 007 always got some pleasure out of these stays, he couldn’t afford to relax and drop his guard; when on the job, Bond was in constant danger of being counter-spied on and ambushed. Thus, when he stepped out of his room, the vigilant secret agent always left “minute burglar alarms” that would detect the intrusion of his antagonists and alert him to the fact that someone had gone through his belongings while he was away. A hair (plucked from his head; you could use thin thread or lint) here, a faint dusting of talcum powder there, left telltale evidence of a disturbance. 

Whether you’re at home or in a hotel, in the business of earning “danger-money” or just a teenager who wants to know if Mom or Dad’s been snooping in your room, the tactics above — all drawn from Bond’s various adventures — will help you know if someone’s been poking through your things.

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