This person’s 45-tweet rant about the imperial system is hilariously relatable

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This person’s 45-tweet rant about the imperial system is hilariously relatable

Not everyone is a fan of imperial measurements.
Not everyone is a fan of imperial measurements.

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto

2017%2f09%2f12%2fd7%2fsambwBy Sam Haysom

If you’ve ever found yourself somewhat confused by the logic of the imperial system — you know, pounds, ounces, all that good stuff — you’re not alone.

Because unlike the more modern metric system, which is fairly logical when it comes to the way different measures and weights are broken down, the imperial system just seems a bit… messier.

Anyone who’s ever found themselves struggling to follow a recipe that contains the phrase “cup”, will understand.

Anyway, here to perfectly encapsulate your confusion is this Scottish video games programmer, who on Monday evening went on an epic 45-tweet rant about the issue.

Here’s the entire thread, in all its rage-fuelled glory:

Mic. Dropped.

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El mito de las calorías negativas

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Todo Yin tiene su Yang: la Fuerza de los Jedi su reverso tenebroso, cada héroe su archienemigo, la materia su correspondiente antimateria, La SextaTV tiene 13TV y las integrales, sus derivadas. En este contexto es normal que más allá del simplón balance entre ingreso y gasto de energía, se haya planteado la existencia de las anticalorías o calorías negativas. Una especie de agujero negro que presente en algunos alimentos, que contrarrestaría el efecto de las calorías positivas presentes en otros alimentos. Las puñeteras: las que mantienen acojonada a la mitad de la población de esta galaxia (o incluso a más).

Seguir leyendo.

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Watch the electrifying moment InSight lands on Mars from mission control

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NASA’s InSight spacecraft landed on Mars on Monday, and there’s no better place to relive the nail-biting moment than from inside mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The space agency posted a 360-degree video of the process, including the electrifying moment signals returned from the InSight craft as it landed on Mars. 

Around the 50-minute mark, things start getting real quiet, as the parachute deploys, the radar powers up and locates Mars’ surface, and finally, around 55 minutes, it’s time for touchdown.

Now sitting happily on the surface, the spacecraft has already beamed home photos from Mars — here’s the first one. Read more…

More about Nasa, Mars, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mars Exploration, and Insight

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Mars Lander InSight sends the first of many selfies after a successful touchdown

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Last night’s 10 minutes of terror as the InSight Mars Lander descended to the Martian surface at 12,300 MPH were a nail-biter for sure, but now the robotic science platform is safe and sound — and has sent pics back to prove it.

The first thing it sent was a couple pictures of its surroundings: Elysium Planitia, a rather boring-looking, featureless plane that is nevertheless perfect for InSight’s drilling and seismic activity work.

The images, taken with its Instrument Context Camera, are hardly exciting on their own merits — a dirty landscape viewed through a dusty tube. But when you consider that it’s of an unexplored territory on a distant planet, and that it’s Martian dust and rubble occluding the lens, it suddenly seems pretty amazing!

Decelerating from interplanetary velocity and making a perfect landing was definitely the hard part, but it was by no means InSight’s last challenge. After touching down, it still needs to set itself up and make sure that none of its many components and instruments were damaged during the long flight and short descent to Mars.

And the first good news arrived shortly after landing, relayed via NASA’s Odyssey spacecraft in orbit: a partial selfie showing that it was intact and ready to roll. The image shows, among other things, the large mobile arm folded up on top of the lander, and a big copper dome covering some other components.

Telemetry data sent around the same time show that InSight has also successfully deployed its solar panels and its collecting power with which to continue operating. These fragile fans are crucial to the lander, of course, and it’s a great relief to hear they’re working properly.

These are just the first of many images the lander will send, though unlike Curiosity and the other rovers, it won’t be traveling around taking snapshots of everything it sees. Its data will be collected from deep inside the planet, offering us insight into the planet’s — and our solar system’s — origins.

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