All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

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All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

If you have ever experienced going to a music festival and sleeping in a tent you already know how shitty that can be. Well, these Belgian designers came up with a cool looking and comfortable solution for that: Hexagonal sleeping cells each containing a king-size bed.

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

"We thought, why not stack a honeycomb, not for bees, but for festival goers to offer a very comfortable, cozy alternative for the overbooked and overpriced hotels during festival times?"

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

All music festivals should offer these king-size sleeping modules

This is how the cells are supposed to be installed:


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​Speed-Optimized Browser Pale Moon is Now on Android

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​Speed-Optimized Browser Pale Moon is Now on Android

Android: Pale Moon is a speed-optimized version of Firefox that we love on the desktop. Now it you can get it—and all of its performance improvements—on your Android phone or tablet.

Pale Moon is optimized for speed and efficiency. Like the desktop version, it supports add-ons from the Mozilla Add-Ons catalog. This Android port comes from XDA developer cyansmoker, and it can be personalized with add-ons from the Firefox add-ons catalog. The browser is free to download and use, but it’s not available in Google Play, so you’ll need to enable third party app support and sideload it.

The download link below is for a copy of the file hosted on Mega. If it proves problematic, take a look at the thread on XDA Developers for mirrors. It’s also worth keeping an eye on the thread if you run into problem with the app itself. It is currently in alpha and not guaranteed to work with every device.

Pale Moon (Free) | XDA Developers Forum via XDA Developers Blog

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Are You Managing Your Social Media Presence Properly?

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Social media is an excellent tool for various purposes. Online marketers extend their reach, and engage their followers to achieve their goals. Bloggers use it to get more traffic and network with other people. For others, social media is merely a venue to share what they find interesting, voice out their thoughts and opinions, and […]

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Add Landscape to Milky Way Pictures For Breathtaking Stellar Photography

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Milky-way-photography

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Mike Taylor is an accomplished landscape astrophotographer and an instructor for night photography and post-processing. Taylor contributed this article to Space.com’s Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

As a night photography instructor, I’m always encouraging students to integrate inspiring landscape elements in their photographs to create stunning night-sky compositions. During a recent trip to Utah, I came across an iconic, gnarly tree clinging to the top of the canyon wall at Dead Horse Point State Park, and I knew I had to incorporate it into some astrophotographs. While one of my cameras shot time-lapse footage of the Milky Way moving across the sky behind the tree, I set up another camera to capture a 16-image panorama that features the full Milky Way arc and covers 240 degrees of view from north (left) to south (right). Read more…

More about Digital Photography, How To, Us World, Milky Way, and Landscapes

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This Game Generates the Infinity of Space With an Algorithm

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Sean Murray, one of the creators of the computer game No Man’s Sky, can’t guarantee that the virtual universe he is building is infinite, but he’s certain that, if it isn’t, nobody will ever find out. “If you were to visit one virtual planet every second,” he says, “then our own sun will have died before you’d have seen them all.”

No Man’s Sky is a video game quite unlike any other. Developed for Sony’s PlayStation 4 by an improbably small team (the original four-person crew has grown only to 10 in recent months) at Hello Games, an independent studio in the south of England, it’s a game that presents a traversable universe in which every rock, flower, tree, creature and planet has been “procedurally generated” to create a vast and diverse play area. Read more…

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Thiel Fellow’s Elegant Sleep Sensor, The Sense, Crushes Kickstarter With $120K In A Few Hours

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james-proud When I first took a look at the Sense, a smart sleep sensor launching today on Kickstarter, it reminded me of two things. Beijing’s Bird’s Nest stadium and Google’s old, discontinued Nexus Q product. “Those are two of my favorite things,” said James Proud, a former Thiel fellow who went on to found a startup behind the device called Hello. “I wanted to… Read More

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All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

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All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

NASA has revealed spectacular, newly reprocessed images of four of the most amazing supernovas ever captured by a human science instrument—the Crab Nebula (top), Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58—to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the Chandra observatory. I decided to go one step further and collect them all.

We have detected other supernova, but I have avoided them in this list because they were either too distant to be observed with this detail (like this one) or they were detected before we had the appropriate instrumentation to photograph them at all (we have a historical record of them and even drawings of them, but no photos.)

What you can see here are the complete collection of most important ever captured by humankind’s instruments, starting with the rest of the new Chandra series:

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Tycho

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

G292.0+1.8

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

3C58

NASA’s Astrophysics Division director Paul Hertz says that Chandra has "changed the way we do astronomy."

It showed that precision observation of the X-rays from cosmic sources is critical to understanding what is going on. We’re fortunate we’ve had 15 years – so far – to use Chandra to advance our understanding of stars, galaxies, black holes, dark energy, and the origin of the elements necessary for life.

The following supernovas were taken by Chandra and/or other telescopes:

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Kepler

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

RCW86

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection


SN 1006

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

SN 1054

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Cassiopeia A

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

G1.9+0.3

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

SN 1987A

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Sn2006gy

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Cygnus Loop

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Sig06-030

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

N 63A

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

W49B

Cool supernova candidates

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

Wolf Rayet WR124 is not a supernova—yet. Scientists believe it is a candidate and it’s so spectacular already that I couldn’t avoid including it in this list.

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection


The spectacular Eta Carinae, another forthcoming supernova that had to be included.

My favorite is the Crab Nebula. Or perhaps Cassiopeia A. I don’t know. I always have a very hard time deciding. I just stare at them trying to comprehend the unimaginable power and processes that are photographed here.

All the supernovas ever photographed in one spectacular collection

p.s. I may have forgotten some. If so, please post them in the comments.


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