So How Does Analog Film Work Anyway?

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So How Does Analog Film Work Anyway?

Even though it contains some of the most memorable images in human history, how many of us really know how film actually works?

Let’s break it down to the components. First, those little holes along the side of film strips are called perforations (perfs for short). The sprockets inside cameras and projectors latch onto those to move the film along at a steady pace. Sometimes these holes are on both sides of the film, but in other cases one set of perfs is replaces by a magnetic or optical strip for sound recording.

Between these two rails are the frames themselves, which are measured in a whole slew of confusing ways. The width of the film is what most people are familiar with (8mm, 16mm, 35mm) but it doesn’t tell the whole story: some formats take up more space on the strip; the number of perforations per frame are also important; some are even oriented horizontally! They all have different uses, which partially explains why filmmakers are so obsessive about film stock.

Regardless of which stock is in the camera, film exposes more or less the same way. Different layers of the film are coated with chemicals sensitive to either red, green, or blue light. With all three stacked on top of each other, the exposed film is able to reproduce the full spectrum of visible light.

Depending on what point in the history of cinema you’re talking about, film was made of either acetate, polyester, or nitrocellulose—which was abandoned around 1950 because it was really, really flammable (if you’ve seen Inglourious Basterds, you already know this).

While some directors still opt to shoot on film, we’re reaching a point where digital is able to perform as well as or better than analog, and often at a fraction of the cost. With Academy Awards for both best cinematography and best direction, The Revenant—which was shot digitally with Arri Alexa 65smight be the harbinger of film’s dying days.

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Order porn with emoji because 2016

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Pornemoju

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The eggplant, the peach and the open tongue emoji are handy when sexting, but the adult website Pornhub has taken it next level. 

On Wednesday the pornography giant announced a free service that allows users to send an emoji and receive porn. 

Users text the number designated for their country (available in the U.S., Canada and the UK) with a corresponding emoji based on the genre of porn they want. 

Image: pornhub

The options are explained on the website. For example, send a Mac computer emoji for “webcam” porn, the double swords for “gay,” and the women’s restroom sign for “women’s” videos.  Read more…

More about Tech, Apps, Texting, Sex, and Porn

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Porn Stars Were Asked How They Prepare For A Scene And Theres WAY More Going On Than Youd Expect

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The fine folks over at Wood Rocket are back at it again with their always entertaining and often frightening “Ask A Pornstar” series. In this episode they delve deep behind … Continue reading Porn Stars Were Asked How They Prepare For A Scene And There’s WAY More Going On Than You’d Expect

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The Future of Tripods Gets Rid of All Those Fiddly Knobs and Buttons

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The Future of Tripods Gets Rid of All Those Fiddly Knobs and Buttons

Having a tripod always on hand can mean the difference between a mediocre or a great shot, but only if you can get it set up in time. By eliminating knobs, buttons, and gangly extending legs, Edelkrone has created an interesting tripod alternative that can be easily positioned in seconds.

The Future of Tripods Gets Rid of All Those Fiddly Knobs and Buttons

The unique folding design collapses down to just 20 inches long, but can be raised to a heigh of around five feet. The gadget’s compact footprint and unique flexibility also makes it easier to position a camera closer to certain subjects without having to add extensions.

However, the most notable feature of the Standplus is the unique pivoting hinges that can hold their position without having to loosen or tighten any knobs. In the demo it’s shown easily supporting a DSLR with a decent sized lens hanging off the front, but presumably the amount of weight it can support depends on the angle you intend to use it at.

Will it completely replace the ultra-light and ultra-compact carbon fiber tripod you usually carry hanging off your camera bag? Probably not. The Standplus’ three support legs don’t have a particularly wide stance, making it tricky to use on uneven terrain. And its overall size when collapsed still can’t compete with the smallest of tripods.

For studio work, though, it could be a unique alternative—depending on what the asking price ends up being when it’s available later this year.

[Edelkrone via Fstoppers]

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